ALBERT CAMUS ON MEDICAL PROGNOSIS

ALBERT CAMUS ON MEDICAL PROGNOSIS

“I have no idea what’s awaiting me, or what will happen when this all ends. For the moment I know this: there are sick people and they need curing.”

~ Albert Camus (1913-1960)

The wit and wisdom of Albert Camus won him a Nobel prize in literature (1957).  It was his kaleidoscopic view of life that shaped him into the great philosopher he was – an existentialist.  The Nobel foundation has no prize for philosophy.   Camus had no medical degree so they did not award him the Nobel prize in medicine.  Therefore they were left with only one choice and awarded him the Nobel Prize in literature.

From the other side of the table – Albert Camus was a patient.  He was diagnosed with tuberculosis at a young age and struggled with recurrences most of his life.

In my book The Master Attractor I have a clear advice:

Stay away from physicians who use the language, “The prognosis is guarded”.  That is euphemism for saying the patients is “terminal”.  Definitely stay away from doctors whose opinion is that “the patient has six months to live”.  How do they know?  Those opinions are held by physicians who are reluctant to do what it takes to cure and heal the patient.

When you or your family member hears a physician who has an opinion on who will die and when, just walk out quickly and find another physician who holds an optimistic view of life.  That particularly applies to cancer patients who may be difficult to heal.

Ironically Camus wrote a novel titled “The Plague”.
Camus died during a car accident.  The driver of the car was his publisher, Michel Gallimard.

© 2013 Mandy Lender MD

http://www.mandylender.com

www.karkinosfarm.com

 

About Mandy Lender

Mandy Lender, MD is an author, physician, public speaker and volunteer. He published two books and two more books are in progress. Links: www.mandylender.com www.google.com/+MandyLenderMasterAttractor www.karkinosfarm.com www.visionofhabakkuk.com
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